BRAIN Conference

February 28, 2018

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2018 BRAIN CONFERENCE

Psychiatry, Neuroscience, and You: The Story of the Future

When: Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Overview: Over the past two decades, advances in neuroscience have dramatically enhanced our understanding of the brain and of the neurobiological basis of psychiatric illness. While biological models of mental illness once emphasized “chemical imbalances”, modern perspectives increasingly incorporate the role of genetics and epigenetics, a more nuanced understanding of neurotransmitters and corresponding second messenger systems, the importance of neuroplasticity, and the functional dynamics of neural circuits. New methods and technologies are leading to new discoveries and paving the way to new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment. As educators, we have the responsibility to train the leaders of this new world.

Yet the task is daunting, and it may not be possible to achieve using traditional approaches. As physicians, we know that simply telling patients what they should do – lose weight, quit smoking, exercise more – rarely elicits the change we seek. Similarly, as teachers, we know that lecturing at students does not achieve our educational goals. This is especially true for technically complex content like neuroscience. As psychiatrists, we appreciate that the process of how we communicate is at least as important as what we say.

BRAIN 2018 will be dedicated to exploring the central skills of Effective Scientific Communication. Through a series of interactive workshops, we will focus on how to make cutting edge neuroscience accessible for a clinical audience and the general public, including how to distill complex topics down to their core concepts, to craft a narrative arc around key translational applications, to optimize the visual representation of data, and to attend to performative aspects of presentation. We will also focus on the critical process of defining appropriate learning objectives and ensuring that they are achieved.

The future of psychiatry is bright. The story you tell begins at BRAIN.

New for BRAIN 2018: Choose your own adventure!

  • “Classic”: This track will be dedicated to introducing some of the core NNCI teaching modules. Participants will receive Facilitator’s Guides, experience each module from the learners’ perspective, and reflect on what it would be like to implement the sessions on their own.
  • “Artisanal”: For those ready to take their neuroscience and teaching game to the next level, this track will include an experiential workshop on Effective Scientific Communication. Through a series of interactive exercises, we will lead participants through the process of creating their own “This ‘Stuff’ Is Really Cool” talk. Participants should come with a favorite neuroscience topic in mind!

Note: both groups will participate in the same afternoon activities – the tracks will only apply to the morning half of the conference.

During the registration process, you will need to select on of the two aforementioned tracks. Room assignments will be determined from your selection so requests to make changes after completing your registration will not be accepted.

Intended Audience: Medical educators with little or no neuroscience background, neuroscientists engaged in medical education, students, and residents.

Practice Gap: Psychiatry is in the midst of a paradigm shift. The diseases we treat are increasingly understood in terms of the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors and the development and regulation of neural circuitry. Yet most psychiatrists have a relatively minimal knowledge of neuroscience. This may be due to many factors, including the difficulty of keeping pace with a rapidly advancing field or a lack of exposure to neuroscience during training. To date, neuroscience has generally not been taught in a way that is engaging, accessible, and relevant to patient care. Much of neuroscience education has remained lecture-based without employing active, adult learning principles. It is also frequently taught in a way that seems devoid of clinical relevance, disconnected from the patient’s story and life experience, and separated from the importance of the therapeutic alliance. Regardless of the reason, what has resulted is an enormous practice gap: despite the central role that neuroscience is poised to assume in psychiatry, we continue to under-represent and fail to integrate this essential perspective in our work.

Educational Objectives: This year’s BRAIN Conference will continue to focus on strategies to teach neuroscience and incorporate a modern neuroscience perspective into clinical care. This all-day conference will include a series of morning and afternoon workshops designed to:

1.Empower faculty with or without a neuroscience background to feel confident that they can teach neuroscience effectively;

2.Engage conference attendees to participate as both student and instructor using new and innovative teaching methods; and

3.Provide programs with resources for how they might address, teach, and assess neuroscience-specific milestones.

Through large and small group activities, attendees will receive training in various new and creative approaches to teaching neuroscience.

The registration fee for the BRAIN Conference will cover all sessions, hand-outs, and breakfast and lunch. Sign up online when registering for the AADPRT meeting. We hope you will join us for an exciting and fun day!

Scientific citations:
1.Insel, T. The future of psychiatry (= Clinical Neuroscience). April 20, 2012. https://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/directors/thomas-in.... Accessed October 24th, 2017.

2.Ross, DA, Travis, MJ, Arbuckle, MR. “The future of psychiatry as clinical neuroscience: Why not now?” JAMA Psychiatry, 2015; 72(5):413-414.

3.Arbuckle, MR, Travis, MJ, Ross, DA. “Integrating a neuroscience perspective into clinical psychiatry today”. JAMA Psychiatry, 2017; 74(4):313-314.

Chair:
David A. Ross, MD, PhD
Yale School of Medicine

Co-Chairs:
Joseph J. Cooper, MD
University of Chicago

Ashley E. Walker, MD
University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine

Steering Committee:
Melissa R. Arbuckle, MD, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute

Michael J. Travis, MD
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Confirmed Moderators/Facilitators (includes *NNCI Scholars, Co-Chairs, and Steering Committee)
Mayada Akil, MD
Georgetown University Hospital
Washington, DC

Joan Anzia, MD
McGaw Medical Center,
Northwestern University
Chicago, IL

Melissa Arbuckle, MD, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute
New York, NY

Belinda Bandstra, MD, MA
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

Adrienne Bentman, MD
Institute of Living / Hartford Hospital
Hartford, CT

Robert Boland, MD
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Boston, MA

Kristin Cadenhead, MD
University of California San Diego
San Diego, CA

Lisa Catapano, MD, PhD
George Washington University Medical Center
Washington, DC

Joyce Y. Chung, MD
National Institute of Mental Health
Bethesda, MD

Joseph J. Cooper, MD
University of Chicago
Chicago, IL

Deborah Cowley, MD
University of Washington Medical Center
Seattle, WA

Sallie G. DeGolia, MD, MPH
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

Chandlee Dickey, MD
Harvard South Shore / VAMC
Brockton, MA

Jane Eisen, MD
St. Lukes / Mt. Sinai West
New York, NY

Marshall Forstein, MD
Cambridge Health Alliance / Harvard Medical School
Cambridge, MA

Erick Hung, MD
University of California
San Francisco, CA

Sansea Jacobson, MD
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Michael Jibson, MD, PhD
University of Michigan Health System
Ann Arbor, MI

Shashank V. Joshi, FAAP, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, CA

*Yash Joshi, MD, PhD, MBE
University of California, San Diego
San Diego, CA

*Alison Lenet, MD
Columbia University Medical Center and the New York State Psychiatric Institute
New York, NY

*Elizabeth Mavda, MD
Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical School / McLean Hospital
Boston, MA

Katharine Nelson, MD
University of Minnesota Medical School
Minneapolis, MN

Lindsey Pershern, MD
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Dallas, TX

*Tatiana Ramage, MD
San Mateo County Behavior Health & Recovery Services
San Mateo, CA

Sanjai Rao, MD
University of California, San Diego
San Diego, CA

David A. Ross, MD, PhD
Yale School of Medicine
New Haven, CT

Sourav Sengupta, MD
University at Buffalo School of Medicine
Buffalo, NY

Asher Simon, MD
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, NY

Hanna Stevens, MD, PhD
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
Iowa City, IA

Michael Travis, MD
Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Ashley E. Walker, MD
University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine
Tulsa, OK

Randon Welton, MD
Wright State University
Dayton, OH